followup

Feb. 19th, 2010 11:51 pm
acroyear: (Default)
Figure skating controversy much ado about nothing?:
But when Plushenko suggests judges can “arrange” a high placement, Barton begs to differ. He said the system cannot change a judge’s intent, but it can certainly minimize the impact one judge has on any program. Nine judges place marks in the system, two scores are randomly eliminated, then the highest and lowest of the remaining seven marks are eliminated. Technical specialists are also involved in assessing the levels of program elements and contribute to the final mark.
so my idea was incorporated into the system - ditch the highs and lows, but in addition this implies random dropping as well, which i'm not as much of a fan of. random dropping out of 9 has too big an impact.  no scientist or statistician would tell you that random dropping of samples yields better results.

there are judges who specifically look at the exactness of the technique - was a triple-something really a triple, etc, but otherwise, the main judges are just as they were before, looking at both technical and artistic.
acroyear: (makes sense)
The World's Fair : Beach Volleyball and the Public Understanding of Genetics:
But if a Jamaican wins a race and everyone says its because of genes, then why isn't anyone asking if American women have the Beach Volleyball gene? Why isn't everyone asking if the Chinese have the gymnastics gene? Why isn't everyone asking if the Kenyans have the non-skiing gene? Why are Kenyans so god-awful at nordic events? Why oh why could that be? Is it the non-skiing gene? Given the reasoning advanced in the comments to Razib's post, I'm left to conclude that this must be the case. And while we're at it, why isn't everyone asking if the Orioles have the bad-pitching gene?
I do note that - whenever American's win something, it must be due to hard work, personal sacrifice, and a bit of Good Ol' American Luck. Except when it's American technology, like the swimsuits, but that's still "America's system (in this case, pure get-ahead capitalism) just being better".

But whenever someone else wins, oh it's due to everything BUT the hard work of the athlete who really wants to win - it's the genetics, it's the intense state-sponsored training, it's the fact that they're paid for each medal, it's some innate advantage in the nation's geography or weather (nevermind that our athletes move to where the weather is suitable for what they do, often taking their families with them), or, well, they must be cheating in some way.  Or it's a sport that just "sucks" so why do we even bother with it.

It's never due to the idea that just like American athletes, the competitors from other countries just really, really want to win and work really, really hard to get there.  No, it can't be that.  There's no way the rest of the world can actually be just like us, right?

I don't know what's worse, that this egotism continues in the commentary and coverage, or that there's such a large portion in this country that still buy into that crap.

We have, this week, seen the ideal American in many contests, not least Beach Volleyball, Gymnastics individuals & all-around, women's soccer, several track&field events, and much more, including Bryan Clay who's actually doing damn well in the Decathlon.

But for all of those ideal Americans, I got two words that should flat-line those smiles and remind us what most Americans are really like: Bode Miller.

Stand tall.

Besides, sometimes positive genetics can have negative side effects, as this comment shows: Oddly, I now hear that in the US there is strong linkage disequilibrium between the genes for sprinting and not being able to hold a baton.. :)
acroyear: (fof not quite right)
one of the few things where, like softball and beach volleyball, we should have an inside advantage, right?

well...

can someone please tell me why Slovakia has 3 golds in that so far this year?

Slovakia?

good grief...
acroyear: (weirdos...)
On your marks, get set, Lego! Welcome to the Olympics where everyone's quick off the blocks | Mail Online:
As the world watches the Beijing Games, enthusiasts from Hong Kong have unveiled their own Olympics — built entirely from Lego.

More than 300,000 Lego bricks and 4,500 Lego people were used to create the display, by the Hong Kong Lego User Group.
acroyear: (yeah whatever)
Yesterday, Olympic softball, the U.S. slammed the Chinese with 9 runs in the first inning (all on 2 outs).  We gave up and turned the TV off when that inning finally ended.

So all the reports in the sports pages are all about that great victory (yet another American victory where the game stopped after the 5th inning given the insane lead).

But NO report actually asked the real valid question: why didn't they score any more in the subsequent 4 innings?  Had that first inning not happened, that's 4 innings of 0-0 ties going on, showing a not too strong U.S. team in the bigger picture of things...
acroyear: (wham bang zowie)
2008 Beijing Summer Olympics | Oksana Chusovitina, Interview Questions | NBC Olympics. A fascinating interview with the 33 year old Women's vault silver medalist, a former Soviet now competing for Germany (and she explains why...).

QotD

Aug. 17th, 2008 10:34 am
acroyear: (vendaface)
Uncertain Principles: Olympic Comments:
In the end, judged sports are rubbish. This is also why I don't like college football.

I wonder...

Aug. 9th, 2008 08:45 pm
acroyear: (be seeing you)
...if the reason there's no more baseball and softball after this year is 'cause the Brits would have no idea what to do with the ballparks after the games were over...

it's not like they're easily converted into cricket fields (or that they even need more of those), you know...
acroyear: (fof oooh perty...)
cut for spoilers, though it's already been broadcast on nbc )

If you have DirectTV in HD, there's some special effects your remote can do to get info on all the DTV coverage.  Tune to UHD or MSNBC and wait a bit.

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